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Teaching Multicultural Literature : A Workshop for the Middle Grades
Workshop 1 Workshop 2 Workshop 3 Workshop 4 Workshop 5 Workshop 6 Workshop 7 Workshop 8
Workshop 3: Research and Discovery - Shirley Sterling and Laura Tohe
Overview
Authors and Literary Works
Video Summary
Teaching Strategies
Commentary
Student Work
Resources
General Resources
Teaching Strategies
Works By and About Author
Additional Resources
Interactive Workbook -- Explore two poems using strategies from these workshops. Go.
Channel-Talk -- Share your views on the discussion board. Go.

Works By and About Author

Shirley Sterling
Laura Tohe

Shirley Sterling

Works by the Author
Listed below are selected works by the author.

    Sterling, Shirley. My Name Is Seepeetza. Vancouver, B.C.: Groundwood Books, 1992.

Further Readings About the Author

Books


    Eigenbrod, Renate. Creating Community: A Roundtable on Canadian Aboriginal Literature. Penticton, B.C.: Theytus Books, 2002.
    This collection of essays examines Native American literature and includes one essay that looks at symbolism in Shirley Sterling's novel.

Periodicals

    Andrews, Marke. "Bringing a Forgotten Childhood Back to Life." The Vancouver Sun (December 18, 1992):D8.
    This article describes Sterling's own experience in boarding school and talks about how she became a writer.

    Ellis, Sarah. "My Name Is Seepeetza -- Book Reviews." Horn Book (May 1993):365-67.
    This book review compares Seepeetza's life at school to her life at home, contrasting her emotions about the different environments.

    Johnston, Ingrid and Margaret Mackey. "Multicultural Books for Readers 10-18." Emergency Librarian (November-December 1995):24-30.
    The authors discuss methods of selecting multicultural literature for a classroom, suggesting My Name Is Seepeetza as a well-written novel for teaching about Native American history and culture.

Web Sites

    Reading Online: "Writing 'In' Books" (Beth Matlack, November 1999)
    http://www.readingonline.org/reviews/literature/writing/
    This article reviews My Name Is Seepeetza and offers suggestions for bringing the novel into the classroom and for mediating discussions it may foster.

    Language and Literacy: "Life in Residential Schools: A Response to Shirley Sterling's "My Name Is Seepeetza," (Desirée Pelletier, Winter 2000)
    Pelletier expands upon the descriptions of residential school life in My Name Is Seepeetza, and advocates for the use of Sterling's book in classrooms.

Laura Tohe

Works by the Author
Listed below are selected works by the author.

    Tohe, Laura. Making Friends with Water. Omaha: Nosila Press, 1986.
    A number of Tohe's earlier poems are collected in this anthology.

    ---. No Parole Today. Albuquerque: West End Press, 1999.

Further Readings About the Author

Books


    Bataille, Gretchen M. and Laurie Lisa. Native American Women: A Biographical Dictionary. New York: Garland, 1993.
    This well-organized dictionary offers an entry about Laura Tohe with a detailed biography.

    Francis, Lee. Native Time: A Historical of Native America. New York: St. Martin's Press, 1996.
    This reference guide to Native American history includes an informative entry about Laura Tohe and her work.

Web Sites

    Dr. Laura Tohe's Web site
    http://www.public.asu.edu/~ltohe/
    Laura Tohe's university Web site contains her curriculum vita, contact information, and information about classes she teaches.

    Laura Tohe
    http://www.hanksville.org/storytellers/tohe/
    This short biography of Laura Tohe offers links to her work online, a bibliography, and a list of anthologies that contain her work.

    Reznet: "Survivor" (Benny Polacca, January 13, 2005)
    http://www.reznetnews.org (see Culture)
    In this article, Laura Tohe discusses her time as a student in a residential school, her experiences writing No Parole Today as a graduate student, and her current role as a university professor.

Periodicals

    Arizona Humanities Council. "Laura Tohe: Commitment to Heritage." Arizona Insight Newsletter (May 1997):3.
    The Arizona Humanities Council, an organization dedicated to promoting the recognition of the variety of cultures in Arizona, interviews Laura Tohe.

Film/Video

    Distant Voices, Thunder Words. Nebraska Educational Television, 1990.
    Laura Tohe is interviewed in this documentary about Native American and African storytelling traditions.

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