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1. Introduction
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Re: [Channel-talkgeography] Question

From: Herbert Belcher <Herbert.Belcher@sdhc.k12.fl.us>
Date: Tue Mar 06 2007 - 14:17:33 EST
X-Mailer: FirstClass 8.3 (build 8.280)

Ms Weiser,

Regions are mercurial by nature. Regions can be viewed together, very far
apart with similar political viewpoints, or economics. Regions can be
loosely connected by language (Spanish) or strictly connected (Arabic).
We can view a region as purely physical, such as areas of Africa,
Caribbean islands, or even to the extent of internal politics within
America (Red and Blue States). If you look at the polices of America
towards ALL Islamic countries since 9/11 you can understand the real world
policy implications. Even now, we are holding individuals who hold
British passports and barring them from entry into the US due to their
national origin (Islamic Countries).

Yes they are asking about "
>Are they asking how regions are formed by location,
>cultural make-up,
similarities
> and differences...
".

Perfect examples of this are the two countries of Brazil and Argentina.
Two countries, two separate economies, two separate languages, two
separate governments, and two separate ways to look at the future.

Many times regions are time sensitve or even ruler sensitive. Hitler and
Mussolini? Mao and Stalin? NATO is a perfect example. Used extensively
after WW II to thwart Communism. With the fall of the wall, NATO still
exists but for an entirely different reason. Along with the fall the
entire face of Europe has changed. No longer divided by the Iron Curtain,
then it was divided by nationality or regionally. Wars have raged between
heretofore parts of Yugoslavia. They are still fighting, even with the UN
peacekeepers there. There are now pushes to get rid of all foreigners in
the many countries of 'western' Europe.

Today America has been a consistent friend with Saudia Arabia, Egypt,
Turkey, United Arab Emirates, but yet these same countries are funding
Hamas, a very lethal arm of the radical Islam branch of Iran. America is
instead funding the Sunni and Christian elements in Lebanon in an effort
to thwart radical Islam.

What has this to do with regions? Well, stop and look at our own back
yard. America is dealing with the radicalization of our own Christian
religions with zealots who wish to take over the White House (or have they
already?), mainstream media (FOX), and the creation of a war machine to
insure we defeat radical Islam? Is this the Crusades again? Instead of
the Church funding it, the USA is.

It is no longer a leap to say "Kill all terrorist", just like it was not a
leap to say "Kill a Commie for Christ", as easy as it was to burn women
at the stake for witchcraft, and considering where we rose from "a
revolution by those terrorist rebels in the colonies...' we must remember
where we came from. Had it not been for France, America would not be.
Yet France is considered to be the anathema to America today.

Regions, nah they aren't important they are the reason we are here today.

Jay Belcher
7th Grade Geography
Memorial Middle School
Tampa, Fl
herbert.belcher@sdhc.k12.fl.us

Discussion list for TEACHING GEOGRAPHY <channel-talkgeography@learner.org>
on Monday, March 05, 2007 at 6:36 PM -0500 wrote:
>I am confused about how a spacial understanding of regions translate into
>real-world policy. Are they asking how regions are formed by location,
>cultural make-up, simularities and differences... in relation to their
>specific location? If we could talk this out, I am sure I can get it.
>
>Brenda L Weiser (Nosal)
>(330)505-3698
>
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Received on Tue Mar 6 14:26:07 2007

 

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Workshop 8 - Global Forces/Local Impact Workshop 7 - Europe Workshop 6 - Russia Workshop 5 - Sub-Saharan Africa Workshop 4 - North Africa/Southwest Asia Workshop 3 - North America Workshop 2 - Latin America Workshop 1 - Introduction