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Engaging With Literature: A Workshop for Teachers, Grades 3-5
Workshop
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About This Workshop

Graduate Credit »

Getting the Materials »

Using the Materials »

More Details About This Workshop »

About the Individual Sessions
in This Workshop »


Educational Basis for This Workshop

About the Teachers Who Appear in This Workshop »

About the Advisors Who Guided This Project »

About the People Who Developed This Project »

Asking Questions: An Interactive Guide
1. Foundations

2. Looking at Literature

3. Starting Classroom Conversations

4. Classroom Dialogues

5. Using Art and Other Disciplines To Enrich Classroom Conversations

6. Beginning the Year

7. Many Students: Many Voices and Abilities

8. Reacting to Students' Work

9. The Professional Teacher

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Engaging With Literature

About This Workshop

Educational Basis for This Workshop

Throughout this workshop, active and engaged literary education is promoted. In celebrating these practices, the teachers you will see in the videos have made these basic assumptions about their work and their students' work:

  • Good works of literature are an important part of every language arts curricula. They can help students as they learn to read, write, speak, and listen.
  • Readers can purposefully interact with a variety of literature, relying on what they know and what they have experienced, and employing not only their logic but also their intuition, to make sense of a text.
  • In this interaction, readers form unique and diverse understandings that grow richer as they are shared with their peers in a respectful classroom atmosphere. These understandings are firmly rooted in the text.
  • Through active engagement in a text, students develop strong mental muscles of logic and analysis on which they can rely throughout their academic career.
In doing so, the following NCTE/IRA Standards for the English Language Arts are addressed:
  • Standard 1. Students read a wide range of print and non-print texts to build an understanding of texts, of themselves, and of the cultures of the United States and the world; to acquire new information; to respond to the needs and demands of society and the workplace; and for personal fulfillment. Among these texts are fiction and nonfiction, classic and contemporary works.
  • Standard 2. Students read a wide range of literature from many periods in many genres to build an understanding of the many dimensions (e.g., philosophical, ethical, and aesthetic) of human experience.
  • Standard 3. Students apply a wide range of strategies to comprehend, interpret, evaluate, and appreciate texts. They draw on their prior experience, their interactions with other readers and writers, their knowledge of word meaning and of other texts, their word identification strategies, and their understanding of textual features (e.g., sound-letter correspondence, sentence structure, context, and graphics).
  • Standard 4. Students adjust their use of spoken, written, and visual language (e.g., conventions, style, and vocabulary) to communicate effectively with a variety of audiences and for different purposes.
  • Standard 11. Students participate as knowledgeable, reflective, creative, and critical members of a variety of literacy communities.
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