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Conversations in Literature
Conversations in Literature — Workshop
About CONVERSATIONS IN LITERATURE

Individual Program
Descriptions

1. Responding
as Readers


2. Envisioning

3. Stepping In

4. Moving Through

5. Rethinking

6. Objectifying
the Text


7. The Stances
in Action


8. Returning to the
Classroom





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Channel-TalkLitConversations

Re: [Channel-talklitconversations] Workshop 3

From: Mary McBride <marymcbride@cox.net>
Date: Sat Aug 02 2008 - 10:09:53 EDT
X-Mailer: Microsoft Outlook Express 6.00.2900.3138

Tami,
I do think that knowing the setting, political climate, arts & music of a
time and place can help the student "step into the story." I do not have
any research on this except that I often do the same type of introduction to
a story. For example, I guide the students, 7th & 8th graders, into short
stories (vocabulary), the timeframe, industrial revolution, working
conditions, types of foods available, maps of the setting, climate of the
region, working musicians & artists, political climate, etc.; before having
them read Mary Shelley's Frankenstein.
I think helping the students understand the place & times of the author's
life and of the work itself is very important.
Mary McBride

----- Original Message -----
From: "Tami O'Neill" <tamera.oneill@gmail.com>
To: <channel-talklitconversations@learner.org>
Sent: Sunday, July 20, 2008 8:25 PM
Subject: [Channel-talklitconversations] Workshop 3

>I am working through the Conversations in Literature Workshops individually
> and just completed session 3. As I was brainstorming ways to help
> students
> enter the text for the first time, I wondered if an old strategy I had
> used
> would work. In the past, I have had students do mini research projects to
> discover information about the time or place in which a novel is set. I
> usually let students choose what they learn about, but there are
> guidelines. I wonder if this is an effective method of helping them gain
> background knowledge that will then help their stepping into a text, or if
> this really is a non-authentic assignment that will not help in the long
> run.
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Received on Mon Aug 4 09:32:12 2008

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