Teacher resources and professional development across the curriculum

Teacher professional development and classroom resources across the curriculum

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Sub Image2:Macro to Micro Structures
         
 
Workshops
1) Atoms and Molecules2) Macro to Micro Structures
3) Energetics and Dynamics4) Theory and Practice in Chemical Systems5) Chemical Design6) The Chemistry of Life7) Chemistry and the Environment8) Chemistry at the Interface
 

Unit 2.4 Using Models
This unit shows teachers performing demonstrations and presenting models which are used to visualize polarity and solubility. These activities are aimed at micro-level understanding of macro phenomena. Video program cues: 23:20 — 30:55

Polarity and solubility demonstrations

Dr. Leslie Pierce demonstrates the difference between polarity and solubility of alcohol and water.

Activity

Link

  • A series of demonstrations to extend those shown by Dr. Pierce in the video.

Readings
Furio, C. and Calatayud, M.-L. (1996)' Difficulties with the Geometry and Polarity of Molecules: Beyond Misconceptions, 'Journal of Chemical Education, Vol. 73, No. 1, pp: 36.

Sanger, M.J. and Badger II S.M. (2001)' Using Computer-Based Visualization Strategies to Improve Students' Understanding of Molecular Polarity and Miscibility, 'Journal of Chemical Education, Vol. 78, No. 10, pp: 1412-1416.

Machado, C. (2001)' An Easy and Versatile Experiment to Demonstrate Solvent Polarity Using Solvatochromic Dyes, 'Journal of Chemical Education, Vol. 78, No. 5, pp: 649-651.

Letcher, T.M. and Battino, R. (2001)' An Introduction to the Understanding of Solubility, 'Journal of Chemical Education, Vol. 78, No. 1, pp: 103.

Relating macro and micro

“Understanding the chemistry of atmospheric processes, for instance, the issue of ozone depletion, requires knowledge of a wide range of spatial scales. First, you need to do studies on the micro scale and look actually on the atomic level, and look at the reactions occurring between various types of chlorine compounds and ozone, and what’s happening on the surface of little particles in the atmosphere. It’s very small detailed chemistry which is in the heart of what’s going on. But to place it in a larger context, you also need to be able to study atmospheric processes as a whole, as they occur around the globe. You have to understand the ozone and compounds that are made on one end of the earth, and are transported to another end of earth. These are very central tools to environmental science, where you feed in little bits and pieces of knowledge that you learn from experiments in the lab, including the rate of a particular reaction between two molecules, and fit it into a framework of all important processes are occurr in the atmosphere over a whole planet and hopefully, if the model is done well, you can recreate what you are actually seeing in the atmosphere.”

Dr. Laurie Geller
National Academy of Sciences, Washington, D.C.

Links

  • Description of videodisc available from the Journal of Chemical Education. Part I of the videodisc contains demonstrations and animations of many chemical concepts including polarity and solubility.
  • Description of videodisc available from the Journal of Chemical Education. Part II of the videodisc contains demonstrations and animations of many chemical concepts including polarity and solubility.

Readings
Ibanez, J.G.; Singh, M.M.; Szafran, Z. (1998)' Laboratory Experiments on Electrochemical Remediation of the Environment. Part 4: Color Removal of Simulated Wastewater by Electrocoagulation-Electroflotation, 'Journal of Chemical Education, Vol. 75, pp: 1040-1041.

Proceed to Unit 2.5 arrow
 
 

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