Teacher resources and professional development across the curriculum

Teacher professional development and classroom resources across the curriculum

Monthly Update sign up
Mailing List signup
Search
MENU
LINK: Social Studies in Action Home Image of a high school student in the classroom.
LINK: Competing Ideologies Home
LINK: About the Class
LINK: Watching the video
Connecting to Your Teaching
LINK: Standards
LINK: Resources

Connecting to Your Teaching

Image of a notebook with the following text displayed: Reflect: As you reflect on these questions, jot down your responses or discuss them in a group.

Reflecting on Your Practice

  • What are some concepts or ideologies related to the course you teach that would engage students in some aspect of history?
  • How does your class differ from Mr. Brooks's class? How would you introduce an ideology to your own students?
  • How can you use life experiences, examples, analogies, or metaphors to teach a concept?
  • What kinds of questions do you use when you teach? How do you determine when to use different kinds of questioning techniques?
  • When do you use class presentations, and why? What factors do you consider most important in planning and giving class presentations? How do presentations fit in with the other teaching strategies you use?
  • How do you assess your students' presentations?

Taking It Back to Your Classroom

  • After studying a major ideology, ask your students to spend the next week or month looking for evidence of the ideology in their everyday lives. Then divide the class into small groups to think of ways to categorize and present what they have found.
  • Select a major topic or process and ask students to think of questions that will help them apply and extend what they have learned. For example, "How can I apply my understanding of democracy to my life outside the classroom?"
  • Plan how students can present what they've investigated to the class. Work with students to develop criteria that their presentations must meet. Then use the criteria to assess how successfully they have fulfilled the assignment.

For related print materials and Web sites, see Resources.

© Annenberg Foundation 2014. All rights reserved. Legal Policy