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Robin Migration Update: April 30, 2013
Please Report
Your Sightings!
Report Your Sightings
Some robins are still migrating, while others are singing and nesting. Explore what happens in a robin's nest and discover three things that newborn robins can already do.

This Week's Update Includes:

Image of the Week
Four robin eggs in nest
Photo: Teri Bickmore
Hatching Soon!
News: Migrating, Singing, Nesting

What's Happening Now
All but two of our "first song" reports were from Canada this week. The robins pushed north again, but not everywhere: "They are about 2 weeks late!" noted Margot in Alberta, Canada. The migration and breeding cycle continue to unfold, as some of this week's reports illustrate:

"I regularly see a robin flying in and out of a hole in an evergreen tree/shrub on my property where I had previously seen a nest." Eric B, Gr. 11, Illinois Virtual School in Oswego, IL (April 28)

"Robins must have really gotten down to business when they came back. I saw some nest building on Wed. and by Saturday I found a nest with 3 beautiful blue eggs in the crabapple tree. This pair was quick." March, Clarksburg, PA (April 27)

"On April 26th I saw a robin next to a nest and I think that it was raising a family (it was in a pine tree). I am in the 2nd grade!." Annie, Old Town, Maine (April 26)

Still Waiting at the End of the Trail
From Shageluk, the farthest north of our NOPs, students at Innoko River School write:

"Hi Journey North Students! As of Friday, April 26, no Robin sightings yet! Last year our first Robin (Gonondadoy is the DegXinag name) came on April 20. It's been quite interesting because we haven't had storms in the interior of Alaska. When there are storms, we usually see a delay in Robin migration."

What to Watch For

Robin fluffing its feathers after a bath
Photo: Randy Indish
All Wet
 
Piebald (leucistic) robin
Photo: Teri Bickmore
Piebald Robin
 
Students at Innoko River School fill birdfeeders.
Photo: Joy Hamilton
Gonondadoy is Late!


Explore: Nests are Nurseries
Robin nests are nurseries. Why does Mother Robin lay just one egg a day until she has four eggs? What three things can newborn robins already do on the day they hatch? What is life like for robin nestlings and parents? Find out in this week's slideshow as you explore:

Essential Question:
What takes place in a robin's nest?

Cover of slideshow/booklet: Baby Robins: Welcome to the World!

The Migration: Maps
The picture of migration 2013 is almost complete! These maps show where people have reported robins and earthworms. Patterns have emerged as citizen scientists report their observations. Singing robins reveal the temperature patterns of North America as we hear reports of robins singing at higher latitudes and at higher elevations.

Thank you, citizen scientists!
Robin Migration Map: First Robin Robin migration map: First robins heard singing Map showing robin nesting behaviors Map showing where  robin nesting behaviors observed
First See
(map/list)
Singing
(map/list)
Earthworms
(map/list)
Nesting Behaviors
(map/list)
Report Your Sightings! What, Where & How
First robin of spring
Singin robin
First earthworm of spring
Robin gathers grass for nest
The First Robin You
See
The First Robin You
Hear Singing
Your first sighting of Earthworms
Robins doing
Nesting Behaviors
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annual evaluation
FINAL update May 7, 2013
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