Teacher resources and professional development across the curriculum

Teacher professional development and classroom resources across the curriculum

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LearnerLog Blog
Use this space to reflect and broaden the discussion as you create excellent learning environments, whether in a school building, at a kitchen table, or in a garden.
Interactives
 


You've bought your ticket and boarded the roller coaster. Now you're barreling down the track at 60 miles per hour, taking hairpin turns and completing death-defying loops. Your heart is in your throat and your stomach is somewhere near your shoes. The only thing separating you from total disaster is a safety harness...but are you really in danger?

The designers of the roller coaster carefully crafted this thrilling ride to be just that, but you're actually in less danger than you think. You face a greater threat of injury playing sports or riding a bike than you do on a park ride. Amusement park rides use physics laws to simulate danger, while the rides themselves are typically very safe.

How do physics laws affect amusement park ride design? In this exhibit, you'll have a chance to find out by designing your own roller coaster. Plan it carefully--it has to pass a safety inspection.You can also experiment with bumper car collisions.

Check the physics glossary to find out more about the terms used in this exhibit. Just click on the glossary icon wherever you see it.

Ready to roll? Go on to the first ride: The Roller Coaster.

 

 

"Amusement Park Physics" is inspired by programs from The Mechanical Universe...and Beyond.

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