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UNIT 22: Global War and Peace

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VIDEO SEGMENT: International Peace Movements

This segment examines the international peace movements that grew out of the devastation and human cost of twentieth-century conflicts. In the aftermath of World War I, at the urging of the United States' President Wilson, the signers of the Versailles Peace Treaty accepted the creation of the League of Nations-an organization designed to ensure world peace.

The League of Nations was not successful in its mission because it had little power to enforce its will, especially if those hostile to its goals withdrew. However, it served as the model for the United Nations, which emerged as a new global peace organization in 1945. The appalling events of the Holocaust gave rise to the notion that there are certain "crimes against humanity" that deserve punishment. So too was born the idea of universal human rights; in 1948 the United Nations adopted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, which sought to affirm the worth and dignity of every person in the world.

From its beginnings until the present, the United Nations has been involved in numerous peace keeping missions in troubled areas. It has also sanctioned the use of military force in some places, such as Korea and the Persian Gulf. Although its missions have failed in some places, the United Nations aspires to be a truly global organization capable of both mediating and resolving conflicts in all parts of the world.

SELECTED IMAGES AND MAPS


Barrett Gallagher, BURIAL AT SEA (1944). Courtesy of National Archives & Records Administration.

Anonymous, UNITED NATIONS NEGOTIATING TEAM IN KAESONG DURING THE KOREAN WAR (1951). Courtesy of AP/ Wide World Photos.


Anonymous, THE LEAGUE OF NATIONS AT ITS OPENING SESSION, GENEVA (1920). Copyright 2003 Oregon Public Broadcasting and its licensors. All rights reserved.

Anonymous, MRS. ROOSEVELT HOLDS UNIVERSAL DECLARATION OF HUMAN RIGHTS (n.d.). Copyright 2003 Oregon Public Broadcasting and its licensors. All rights reserved.



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