Teacher resources and professional development across the curriculum

Teacher professional development and classroom resources across the curriculum

Monthly Update sign up
Mailing List signup
Search
MENU
x
x
Unit Home
x
Unit Content Overview
x
Readings
x
References & Sources
x
Unit Audio Glossary
x
Related Units
x
x

UNIT 11: Early Empires

x

VIDEO SEGMENT: The Mongol Empire

This segment examines the rise of the Mongols — a people who came to rule a vast empire spanning much of Eurasia in the thirteenth century. In 1206, Mongol clan leaders who had banded together elected a man named Temujin, or Chenggis Khan, to be their universal ruler. Chenggis (or Genghis) Khan claimed a divine right to conquer the world — a claim he combined with his charismatic leadership to win the allegiance of tribal leaders.

The key to Mongol expansion was a highly effective military, which depended on skilled horsemanship and the use of long-range, recursive bows that could be fired in quick succession. These skills allowed the Mongols to easily conquer sedentary, agricultural societies, and to defeat armies many times their size. In fact, by his death in 1227 Chenggis Khan had not only conquered Beijing (in 1215) but most of Central Asia as well.

Chenggis Khan's sons and grandsons continued this expansionary project, and by 1250 had succeeded in conquering most of Eurasia. Perhaps ironically, although the Mongol conquests resulted in the deaths of many hundreds of thousands of people, they also brought a level of peace and security to the vast trade routes of the Eurasian interior. Indeed, even though the Mongol Empire collapsed in the fourteenth century, it encouraged vigorous trade and contacts between distant peoples for a century, and served as the anchor for a Eurasian world system.

SELECTED IMAGES AND MAPS


Anonymous Chinese, CHINGGIS KHAN (n.d.). Courtesy of Chinastock Photos.

Jami'al-Tavarikh, CHINGGIS KHAN CAPTURES CHINESE CITY (n.d.). Copyright 2003 Oregon Public Broadcasting and its licensors. All rights reserved.


White Brothers, THE GREAT WALL, CHINA (1931). Courtesy of Library of Congress.

Anonymous, THE MONGOL DOMAINS IN EURASIA IN 1300 (2001). Courtesy of Houghton Mifflin Company.



x
x
  Home  |  Catalog  |  About Us  |  Search  |  Contact Us  |     Follow The Annenberg Learner on Facebook 
  © Annenberg Foundation 2013. All rights reserved.
Privacy Policy