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UNIT 16: Food, Demographics, and Culture

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RELATED UNITS

Unit 4. Agricultural and Urban Revolutions

What do historians know about the earliest farmers and herders, and the evolution of cities? Newly emerging evidence about the "cradles of civilization" is examined in light of the social, technological, and cultural complexity of recently discovered settlements and cities. It is related to Unit 16 because it explores profound changes that occurred in the human diet as a result of the agricultural revolution. more »

Unit 10. Connections Across Water

How were water routes used as conduits of expansion and trade? The traders of the Indian Ocean, the early Mississippians, and the Norsemen carried death and disease, skills and technologies, philosophies and religion down rivers and across oceans. It is related to Unit 16 because it explores an earlier era in which connections across water produced important cultural changes in many parts of the world. more »

Unit 13. Family and Household

What does the study of families and households tell us about our global past? In this episode examining West Asia, Europe, and China, families and households become the focus of historians, providing a window into the private experiences in world societies, and how they sometimes become a model for ordering the outside world. It is related to Unit 16 because families, like foodways, often provide intimate perspectives on social change in the past. In addition, food preparation was most commonly done within the context of individual families; thus, changes in consumption and production would be felt strongly at the family level. more »

Unit 15. Early Global Commodities

What is globalization and when did it begin? Before the sixteenth century, the world's four main monetary substances were silver, gold, copper, and shells. But it was China's demand for silver and Spain's newly discovered mines in the Americas that finally created an all-encompassing network of global trade. It is related to Unit 16 because it explores some of the other ways global connections altered the world's cultures and economies after 1500. more »





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