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UNIT 24: Globalization and Economics

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READINGS

Reading 1

Candice Goucher, Charles LeGuin, and Linda Walton, In the Balance: Themes in Global History (Boston: McGraw-Hill, 1998). Selections from chapter 20, "The Crossroads of History: Culture, Identity, and Global Community," pp. 912–20.

Abstract: This essay explores some of the many social, technological, and ecological changes that have resulted from the forces of industrialization and globalization. Its main focus is the dramatic ecological changes that have occurred in recent century as a result of deforestation, population growth, and pollution, although it also looks closely at the cost of environmental damage in terms of human health.

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Reading 2

J.R. McNeill, "Of Rats and Men: A Synoptic Environmental History of the Island Pacific," Journal of World History 5, no. 2 (Fall 1994): 299–350.

Abstract: Most Pacific islands have tumultuous environmental histories. The late arrival of humankind in the Pacific, and after that the long isolation of human communities, led to great vulnerability to invasion by alien species, from microbes to mammals. In the broadest terms, the Pacific has seen two human invasions. Original settlers caused many environmental changes, most notably faunal extinctions. Then Captain Cook brought Pacific communities into contact with the wider world, with powerful ecological consequences. Since Cook's time, environmental change has chiefly resulted from population change, invasion by exotic species, and the impact of large-scale market connections.

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Reading 3

Jarle Simensen, "Democracy and Globalization: 1989 and 'The Third Wave,'" Journal of World History 10, no. 2 (Fall 1999): 391–412.

Abstract: This article argues that "the third wave" of democratization that took place around 1989 must be understood in the context of global dynamics. Explanations in terms of power politics, modernization, and diffusion are considered relevant but inadequate. The deeper structural causes are sought in the globalization of the economy, the rise of international institutions, and the development of global normative systems justifying the concept of "world society."

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