Teacher resources and professional development across the curriculum

Teacher professional development and classroom resources across the curriculum

Monthly Update sign up
Mailing List signup
Search
MENU
x
x
Unit Home
x
Unit Content Overview
x
Readings
x
References & Sources
x
Unit Audio Glossary
x
Related Units
x
x

UNIT 23: People Shape the World

x

READINGS

Reading 1

Candice Goucher, Charles LeGuin, and Linda Walton, In the Balance: Themes in Global History (Boston: McGraw-Hill, 1998). Selections from chapter 19, "Resistance, Revolution, and New Global Order/Disorder," pp. 842–44, 87–77.

Abstract: Two world wars and a global depression undermined European hegemony, and resistance movements throughout the colonized world challenged European political, economic, and cultural domination. This essay explores the history of East Asian cultural and political resistance movements and the ideas that sustained them. In particular, it focuses on Mao's marxist-inspired Chinese Revolution and on Japanese resistance to European-inspired models of the nation-state in the wake of the Meiji Restoration of 1868.

Download PDF »


Reading 2

Candice Goucher, Charles LeGuin, and Linda Walton, In the Balance: Themes in Global History (Boston: McGraw-Hill, 1998). Selections from chapter 19, "Resistance, Revolution, and New Global Order/Disorder," pp. 869–72.

Abstract: This essay explores the ways that peoples of the Islamic world responded to growing European influence. One response was to reform along Western lines—to try to reconcile Islamic beliefs with notions of European science, administration, and ideology. Another was to turn away from Western ideas towards traditional Islamic principles about the necessity of joining religion to the state. This essay looks at both responses, as well as the lasting tensions and divisions they have created.

Download PDF »


Reading 3

Beatrice Forbes Manz, "Tamerlane's Career and Its Uses," Journal of World History 13, no. 1 (Spring 2002): 1–25.

Abstract: Tamerlane has remained an important figure in world history, both because of the impact of his career on the world of his time and because he remains fascinating and useful to many people. This paper explores the facts of Temür's career and the uses made of his image following his death, showing how his actions together with the stories circulated during his lifetime served to create a charisma that survives into our time. Tamerlane belonged to two worlds, the Islamic and the Turco-Mongolian, but was not eligible to hold the highest office in either one. To compensate for his low formal position, he deliberately created a persona which bordered on the supernatural. The dynasty he founded reworked earlier traditions to create the figure of a dynastic founder within both the Islamic and the Turkic traditions. Subsequent dynasties in the Middle East and Central and South Asia used Tamerlane to bolster their legitimacy, while European writers and historians found fascination in the contradictions of his personality and the monumentality of his ambitions. Many of the myths recounted later have their origins in stories apparently deliberately circulated by Tamerlane and his entourage. There is a striking continuity in the portrayal of Tamerlane and the use to which he has been put, from medieval Iran and India through the European Renaissance and Enlightenment to Russian, Soviet, and finally Uzbek formulations of history.

Download PDF »



x
x
  Home  |  Catalog  |  About Us  |  Search  |  Contact Us  |     Follow The Annenberg Learner on Facebook 
  © Annenberg Foundation 2013. All rights reserved.
Privacy Policy