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UNIT 19: Global Industrialization

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READINGS

Reading 1

Candice Goucher, Charles LeGuin, and Linda Walton, In the Balance: Themes in Global History (Boston: McGraw-Hill, 1998). Selections from chapter 16, "Dual Revolutions: Capitalist Industrialism and the Nation State;" also pages 912–17.

Abstract: This essay discusses the European origins of capitalist industrialism as it developed between the eighteenth and twentieth centuries. It looks first at the technologies, institutions, and demographic changes that characterized the rise of capitalist industrialism, and then moves to the impact those changes had on society. Finally, it considers the long term effects of technological change, especially the ways those changes have impacted the environment.

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Reading 2

Matthew Pratt Guterl, "After Slavery: Asian Labor, the American South, and the Age of Emancipation," Journal of World History 14, no. 2 (June 2003): 209–41

Abstract: In comparing the adjustments to a free labor economy in the post-emancipation United States South and in slaveholding Cuba, this essay reveals certain parallels and divergences. Most particularly, it emphasizes the relative position of both places in the global, national, and colonial economies, and it explores the political economy of race and work. Following Confederate expatriates and Victorian travelers from the United States to the Caribbean, it also draws attention to various intellectual and cultural connections between Cuba and the American South. Here, too, it is especially concerned with shared notions of race and racial supremacy.

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Reading 3

Daniel Headrick, "Botany, Chemistry, and Tropical Development," Journal of World History 7, no. 1 (1996): 1–20.

Abstract: Two sciences, botany and chemistry, have contributed to the current imbalance between rich and poor countries. In the nineteenth century, to bring the tropics into the world market, Europeans transferred valuable plants and established botanical research institutions. Before 1914 tropical economies kept pace with those of temperate zones. Chemistry had an opposite effect. Synthetic dyes appeared before 1914. During the world wars, chemists synthesized plastics, rubber, and fibers. By reducing the industrial nations' demand for tropical products, synthetics retarded the growth of the tropical economies. Yet Malaysia has shown that tropical nations can compete if they invest in research.

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