Teacher resources and professional development across the curriculum

Teacher professional development and classroom resources across the curriculum

Monthly Update sign up
Mailing List signup
Search
Follow The Annenberg Learner on LinkedIn Follow The Annenberg Learner on Facebook Follow Annenberg Learner on Twitter
MENU
Teaching Math Home   Sitemap
Session Home Page
 
RepresentationSession 05 Overviewtab atab btab ctab dTab eReference
Part E

Evaluating Representation
  Make a Lesson Plan | Summing Up the Session | Final Journal
"Representations should be treated as essential elements in supporting students' understanding of mathematical concepts and relationships; in communicating mathematical approaches, arguments, and understandings to one's self and to others; in recognizing connections among related mathematical concepts; and in applying mathematics to realistic problem situations through modeling."

(NCTM, 2000, p. 67)


 
 

Representations should be an integral part of expanding students' mathematical knowledge. They are not additional mathematical content that must be taught, but rather tools for communicating and analyzing mathematical relationships. In the course of solving and discussing well-chosen problems, students can develop understanding of specific types of representation while also expanding their grasp of the related mathematics content. The choice of problems and representations used in a classroom is a critical link to such learning.


Use the information learned in this session to plan a lesson for one of your classes. Think first about your goals related to specific content and to relevant representations. Choose a compelling problem situation and plan how you will support your students as they solve the problem and expand their facility with a variety of representations and concepts. You may want to consider a task that incorporates the use of technology (a calculator, a spreadsheet, or software) as one of the representations.


Use a problem you teach in your subject area, or select one of the samples from the Learning Math course or other resources.


After you have created your lesson plan, use the Classroom Checklist (an Adobe PDF document) to evaluate it.

Next  Finish the session

    Teaching Math Home | Grades 9-12 | Representation | Site Map | © |  
   
Home | Video Catalog | About Us | Search | Contact Us | Site Map |
  • Follow The Annenberg Learner on Facebook


© Annenberg Foundation 2013. All rights reserved. Privacy Policy.