Teacher resources and professional development across the curriculum

Teacher professional development and classroom resources across the curriculum

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6

Mathematics

Reading in Mathematics

Instructional Strategies That Support Sense Making

The next set of videos highlights instructional strategies that teachers are using to support student engagement in making sense of a range of mathematics texts and other instructional resources. Each video highlights specific strategies designed to effectively engage students in becoming effective readers of a range of mathematics material.

Video and Reflection: Watch Collaborative Talk About Mathematics, which revisits the classroom where students work on exponential and logarithmic functions using a real-world context of earthquakes. You may want to take notes on the questions below.

  • Before you watch: How do you support student engagement in making sense of mathematics texts and other instructional resources? What indicators do you use to monitor whether these supports work?
  • Watch the video: As you watch, pay attention to the reading demands in this high school mathematics classroom. Note the different ways Ms. Burow supports student engagement in making sense of the mathematics text.

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Collaborative Talk About Mathematics

In Constantina “Dina” Burow’s classroom, developing discussion skills within team practice scenarios helps to not only work through the mathematics content at hand, but to also build the very important 21st- century skills of collaboration.

Teacher: Constantina “Dina” Burow

School: Health Sciences High and Middle College, San Diego, CA

Grade: 11

Discipline: Mathematics (Algebra 2)

Lesson Topic: Logarithms and logarithmic functions

Lesson Month: February

Number of Students: 34

Other: Health Sciences High and Middle Colleges is a health-focused charter school.

  • Reflect: In what ways does working collaboratively support student sense making of mathematics text? What strategies do you see used in this classroom that might work in your own classroom?