Teacher resources and professional development across the curriculum

Teacher professional development and classroom resources across the curriculum

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3

Disciplinary Literacy

Reading: Big Ideas

Close Reading

The Common Core State Standards (CCSS) emphasize the value of closely reading a text to comprehend, interpret, and connect important ideas. Close reading <p><strong>close reading</strong><br /> A reading strategy that provides opportunities to analyze text ideas, text structures and features, language use, and author&rsquo;s purpose. The goal is for students to engage in a deeper understanding of text ideas and to connect those ideas with their existing prior knowledge. Close reading is particularly useful to students when reading complex text, as it focuses on a short piece of text or passage within a larger text to analyze and evaluate important ideas. The key strategy for close reading is rereading the same text for different purposes. With each rereading, students gain a deeper understanding of text ideas, the way they are constructed and communicated, and the author&rsquo;s purpose.</p> is a reading approach that provides opportunities to analyze text ideas, text structures and features, vocabulary use, and author’s purpose. The goal is for students to engage in a deeper understanding of text ideas and to connect those ideas with their existing prior knowledge. Close reading is particularly useful to students when reading complex text, as it helps them focus deeply on a short piece of text or passage in order to analyze and evaluate the important ideas being presented.

Close reading involves rereading the same text for different purposes. With each rereading, students gain a deeper understanding of the text ideas, the way they are constructed and communicated, and the author’s purpose. A close reading involves many of the strategies that proficient readers use to make sense of a complex text. For example, close reading promotes setting purposes for reading, accessing and using prior knowledge, organizing and interpreting information, determining meanings of essential terminology, and refining and revising understanding based on new learning. It is especially useful as students engage in increasingly complex text within each discipline.

During a first reading, students may read with little preparation to gain a general understanding of the information being presented. In a second reading of a portion of text, students may focus on the organization, structure,  text features, key vocabulary (usually Tier 3), and the overall purpose. Subsequent readings involve going deeper to interpret and evaluate ideas (Fisher & Frey, 2012; Lapp, Moss, Johnson, & Grant, 2012; Moss, Lapp, Grant, & Johnson, 2015; Shanahan, 2012).