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Data Session 9, Part C: Investigating Variation in Estimates
 
Session 9 Part A Part B Part C Part D Homework
 
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Session 9, Part C:
Investigating Variation in Estimates

In This Part: Using a Stem and Leaf Plot | Judging the Quality of Estimates | Intervals
Describing Intervals | Probabilities

Here is the entire region we've been studying. If you actually count all the penguins, you'd find that there are exactly 500. Notice that the number of penguins varies from sub-region to sub-region. Some of the squares in the grid contain as few as one penguin, and some contain as many as nine. On average, each of the 100 sub-regions contains five penguins.


 

Problem C2

Solution  

Now that you know the actual total number of penguins, let's examine the stem and leaf plot of the 100 estimates from sample size 10:

a. 

What is the best estimate? For how many samples did this estimate occur?

b. 

What are the six worst estimates?

c. 

What percentage of the estimates are 50 or fewer penguins away from the actual total?

d. 

What percentage of the estimates are 100 or fewer penguins away from the actual total?


Stop!  Do the above problem before you proceed.  Use the tip text to help you solve the problem if you get stuck.
Since there are 100 samples, the percentage will be the actual number of estimates found.   Close Tip

Next > Part C (Continued): Intervals

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