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Data Session 8: Solutions
 
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Solutions for Session 8, Part D

See solutions for Problems: D1 | D2 | D3


Problem D1

The probability is one-half. If you look at the picture of the Push Penny board, you'll notice that the shaded strips are one diameter wide, and the unshaded strips are also one diameter wide:

This means that, if the game is random, it is just as likely for the coin to land on a shaded strip as on an unshaded strip. This makes the probability of hitting a line (and landing on a shaded strip) equal to one-half, or 50%.

<< back to Problem D1


 

Problem D2

Let's use a probability table to compare the experimental probability for this player to the probabilities for a random player:

Number of Hits

Experimental Frequency

Experimental Probability

Probability for Random Player

0

2

.02

0.0625

1

14

.14

.2500

2

29

.29

.3750

3

34

.34

.2500

4

21

.21

.0625

This player seems to have improved. In particular, this player's experimental probability of getting four hits in four tries is more than three times larger than the expected probability for a random player. This suggests that this player has developed skill in playing Push Penny.

<< back to Problem D2


 

Problem D3

Answers will vary. Good luck!

<< back to Problem D3


 

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