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Earth & Space Science: About the Course

Teacher-Talk EarthSpace

Re: [Channel-talkearthspace] Session 2

From: Neal Utesch <utescnea@sergeant-bluff.k12.ia.us>
Date: Wed Mar 21 2007 - 17:06:20 EDT
X-Mailer: Novell GroupWise Internet Agent 7.0.1

I agree, I do think that taking this class will help me to understand it
better and hopefully increase my knowledge base for the content, if I
should happen to ever teach rocks again. Thanks for the comments--Neal

>>> "strickland-stacy" <strickland-stacy@harris.k12.ga.us> 3/21/2007
3:00 pm >>>
No - my major was in Biology and I had a lot of Ecology and
Environmental science courses, so science is just my thing. But....I'm
still learning some of this stuff, too. I know most of it, but some
more superficially than I'd like. I think that in order for us to be
better teachers we need to have a better understanding, so while I know
it, I don't make connections that I feel like I need to make in order to
teach it...does that make sense? Looking forward to comments on Session
3.

Stacy Strickland
HCCMS, Special Education

"Our greatest fear is not that we are inadequate; our greatest fear is
that we are powerful beyond measure."

~Marianne Williamson

-----Original Message-----
From: channel-talkearthspace-bounces@learner.org on behalf of Neal
Utesch
Sent: Wed 3/21/2007 4:36 PM
To: Discussion list for ESSENTIAL SCIENCE FOR TEACHERS: EARTH
ANDSPACESCIENCE
Subject: Re: [Channel-talkearthspace] Session 2
 
Sorry--I think that what I meant to say was that the magma cools at
the
surface and contributes to the formation of an igneous rock. The
subject of rocks is pretty new to me, so I get easily confused with
the
information on all three different types of rocks. I did respond to
your last e-mail, did it not come--I can re-respond for you if you did
not get it. I enjoyed your comments on the first film as well as on
this session. Like I said, the rock thing is confusing to me. Have
you
taught about rocks much in your teaching career. It has been 8 years
since I taught rocks and still the information seems brand new to me.
Thanks your comments and I will get back to you on session 3. Neal

>>> "strickland-stacy" <strickland-stacy@harris.k12.ga.us> 3/21/2007
12:55 pm >>>
Neal, you said that "As these pockets of magma cool slowly
underground,
the magma becomes igneous rocks." How do these pockets cool? Aren't
they called magma chambers?

You also said:
"The second type of rock is the sedimentary rock. A sedimentary rock
will is actually a combination of layers of sand, silt, and dirt that
have collected over the years. The video stated that many of the
sedimentary rocks form in water due to the extreme amount of weather
that can take place on materials in the water. Sedimentary rocks are
formed mainly by the weathering of other rocks, or from the
transporting
of other materials such as sand, silt, and clay by water and where it
is
deposited. Where the material is deposited is where the materials
will
combine with years of layering to form new rocks, sedimentary rocks!"

Sedimentary rocks also are formed by the cementation of pieces of
weathered rock material. As minerals leach from the rock particles,
some of those minerals form natural cements that when combined with
water, cement the particles together to form sedimentary rocks.

You also said that "The rocks are under tons and tons of pressure,
which fosters a build up of heat." I don' think the pressure itself
fosters the buildup of heat. I think that heat and pressure must be
present to create a metamorphic rock, but I don't think that the
pressure creates the heat....

Thanks for discussing things with me - did you read my email from last
week? I submitted something last week about the video and the
readings....

Stacy Strickland
HCCMS, Special Education

"Our greatest fear is not that we are inadequate; our greatest fear is
that we are powerful beyond measure."

~Marianne Williamson

-----Original Message-----
From: channel-talkearthspace-bounces@learner.org on behalf of Neal
Utesch
Sent: Wed 3/21/2007 2:22 PM
To: channel-talkearthspace@learner.org
Subject: Re: [Channel-talkearthspace] Session 2
 
Thoughts on the video, Every Rock Tells a Story...

The second video was all about rocks and what make them up. Before
you
can understand what makes a rock, you have to know what it is. A
rock,
according to the video, is the inorganic parent material of soil.
Essentially what that means to me is that soil is what makes up rocks
along with other inorganic substances. It is estimated by scientists
that you can trace a rocks existence as far back as 500 million years
ago. I think that this is pretty amazing and was skeptical on how
until
after I watched the video. I think that it is interesting that you
can
age a rock by looking at the amount of radioactive material that is
present in the rock.
While watching the video, I thought that being a geologist would be a
rather boring job, but as I continued to watch, I compared the job to
that of a CSI investigator. The geologists are actually working at
identifying unknown information about rocks. Much like a crime scene
investigator, they are looking for clues to the questions that they
have
about the rocks make up, origin, and age. I guess when I look at it
from that perspective; it would be a very exciting and interesting
job.

Main questions that were presented in the video were: What are rocks?
How do they form? How can we determine how old rocks are? How can
reading rocks help us to understand the earth's past? According to
the
information in the video, rocks can be three different types. The
first
type of rock I learned about is the igneous rock.
Igneous rocks are called fire rocks and are formed either underground
or above ground. Underground, they are formed when the melted rock,
called magma, deep within the earth becomes trapped in small pockets.
As
these pockets of magma cool slowly underground, the magma becomes
igneous rocks. Igneous rocks are also formed when volcanoes erupt,
causing the magma to rise above the earth's surface. When magma
appears
above the earth, it is called lava. Igneous rocks are formed as the
lava
cools above ground.
The second type of rock is the sedimentary rock. A sedimentary rock
will is actually a combination of layers of sand, silt, and dirt that
have collected over the years. The video stated that many of the
sedimentary rocks form in water due to the extreme amount of weather
that can take place on materials in the water. Sedimentary rocks are
formed mainly by the weathering of other rocks, or from the
transporting
of other materials such as sand, silt, and clay by water and where it
is
deposited. Where the material is deposited is where the materials
will
combine with years of layering to form new rocks, sedimentary rocks!
The third type of rock talked about in the video is the metamorphic
rock. Metamorphic rocks are rocks that have "morphed" into another
kind
of rock. These rocks were once igneous or sedimentary rocks. How do
sedimentary and igneous rocks change? The rocks are under tons and
tons
of pressure, which fosters a build up of heat, and this causes them to
change. If you exam metamorphic rock samples closely, you'll discover
how flattened some of the grains in the rock are. This is due to the
heat and pressure in formation.
When we begin to examine a rock it is important to look at the rock
and
observe its color, shape, and distinguishing features that may help to
identify what kind of rock it is, where it came from, and Record
melting, transpiration, and read a rock to find out how it formed and
the Earth's history. To determine the age of a rock it is important
to
look at how much radioactive material exists in the rock. You can
also
tell the age of a rock if it contains a fossil. This could tell you
about the rocks origin and give you some history on when it formed.
Studying the fossils in rocks can help you a lot. Rocks are like
puzzle
pieces that help us to understand the history of Earth.

Reflection of Reading (Materials and their Properties: Rocks)

What ideas from the author do you find to be the most important and
useful in teaching about rocks?

I think that before you can start teaching kids about rocks, you need
to first understand what it is that kids believe or think about rocks
and their formations. According to the authors of the article,
children
have trouble distinguishing between rocks and their component minerals.

They do not know that they are two separate things. Students need to
understand those minerals are what help to make up rocks and
contribute
to their formation. I think that it is important for kids to
understand
how the rocks can form and the different ways that rocks are assembled.

Rocks are made up of a mixture of different elements and minerals and
students need to understand what those elements are and how they
contribute to the formation of a rock.
By looking at the three different types of rocks and the ways that
they
are formed, I think that students would have a better perception of
what
is in a rock and what makes it up. The authors of the article break
down the information on igneous, metamorphic, and sedimentary rock
formation and help to describe their formation in language that kids
will understand.
Another important aspect of studying rocks understands the rock cycle
and how it influences the creation of new rocks. When studying the
rock
cycle you will need to explain to students how weathering, heat, and
compaction play a role in rock formation and can determine the type of
rock created. Are their layers? Is the rock crystallized? All of
these questions can help students to analyze how the rock was formed
and
where it originated from. Experimenting with models of weathering and
creating folds and faults to examine what takes place will also help
students to visualize the creation of rocks.

Let me know what you think...

Thanks again for talking about this with me and sharing your ideas.
Any one else who wants to join in...it would be great. Neal Utesch

>>> "strickland-stacy" <strickland-stacy@harris.k12.ga.us> 3/15/2007
12:12 pm >>>
Is there anyone out there for session 2 discussion? Neal and I
discussed Session 1 yesterday and I would like to invite others to
join
in!
 
Stacy Strickland
HCCMS, Special Education
 
"Our greatest fear is not that we are inadequate; our greatest fear is
that we are powerful beyond measure."

~Marianne Williamson

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Received on Wed Mar 21 16:08:38 2007

 

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