Teacher resources and professional development across the curriculum

Teacher professional development and classroom resources across the curriculum

Monthly Update sign up
Mailing List signup
Search
Follow The Annenberg Learner on LinkedIn Follow The Annenberg Learner on Facebook Follow Annenberg Learner on Twitter
Rediscovering Biology Logo
Home
Online TextbookCase StudiesExpertsArchiveGlossarySearch
Unit 10: Neurobiology
Back to Unit Page
Unit Content
Unit Textbook Chapter
Animations & Images
Expert Interview Transcripts
Unit Glossary
Related Resources
Unit Activities  
Wolfhard Almers, PhD
Senior Scientist, Vollum Institute
Wolfhard Almers, PhD, is a senior scientist at the Vollum Institute in Portland, Oregon. Neurons release neurotransmitter packed in vesicles in a process called exocytosis. Almers uses evanescent field microscopy to visualize and examine the events and molecules surrounding exocytosis, including vesicle docking, membrane fusion and recycling.

Fred Gage, PhD
Professor of Genetics
Fred Gage, PhD, is a professor in the Laboratory of Genetics at the Salk Institute in San Diego. His research is focused on the generation of new neurons during adulthood, an idea that runs counter to neuroscience dogma. Gage hopes that the work will one day lead to therapeutic uses for people with stroke, paralysis, or Alzheimer's disease.

Richard Huganir, PhD
Professor of Neuroscience; Investigator, Howard Hughes Medical Institute
Richard Huganir, PhD, is a professor of neuroscience at Johns Hopkins University and an investigator with the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. His laboratory is working to understand the interaction of molecules during long-term potentiation, a neuronal hyperactivity that is thought to underlie learning and memory.

John Williams, PhD
Senior Scientist, Vollum Institute
John Williams, PhD, is a senior scientist at the Vollum Institute in Portland, Oregon. Williams investigates the actions of different endogenous neurotransmitters and exogenous drugs on the neurons that act in the "reward pathway," which comprise the cellular circuit that is responsible for drug addiction.


  Home  |  Catalog  |  About Us  |  Search  |  Contact Us

| Follow The Annenberg Learner on Facebook
 

  © Annenberg Foundation 2013. All rights reserved.
Privacy Policy